My analysis for Thai Enquirer:

In late February and early March, Thailand looked like it had arrived at a political turning point. A no-confidence debate aimed at multiple cabinet ministers had just failed. A wave of student demonstrations had erupted across the country, sparked by anger at the dissolution of the Future Forward Party on February 21.

Less than a year after the 2019 election, the Prayut government’s first major test seemed to have arrived. 

All of this was, of course, upended very quickly as the coronavirus crisis escalated worldwide. In the past two months, politics has taken a back seat as the government grappled with the public health response. Now that the lockdown is slowly being eased, however, and parliament is due to convene later this month, political life may be resuming some level of normalcy. 

As some liveliness is injected back into Thai politics, here are some things to watch out for

Click here for the full piece.

(Cover image credits.)

Published by Ken Lohatepanont

Writer from Bangkok, Thailand; currently a student at the University of California, Berkeley. Enthusiastic about democratic development, international relations and all things politics. I believe in writing to facilitate positive political and social change.

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